Personal Injury Compensation Payout Details Must Be Made Public: PIC

The Personal Injuries Commission (PIC) has called for injury data held by insurance companies to be collated and published.

In its first report from the PIC recommended that data relating to the incidence of ‘whiplash’ and other soft tissue injuries should be made available to the public.

Mr Justice Nicholas Kearns chairs the Commission which was set up to address the rising cost of motor insurance premiums. Justice Kearns said that such data should be made available from insurers so that it can form part of the National Claims Information Database which is being developed by the Central Bank of Ireland at present.

The report finds that the figures being awarded for whiplash claims should correlate to the severity of the injury, with a standardised grading scheme set up to achieve this. It states there needs to be more transparency in relation to payouts for whiplash injuries as levels of general damages are not included in legislation. Award levels are determined ultimately by judicial decisions.

LEGAL FIRMS UNHAPPY WITH REPORT

Separately lawyers that deal with in personal injury compensation cases have hit out at  Personal Injuries Commission’s first recommendations to the Government.

Associate solicitor at Cantillons Solicitors Jody Cantillon, stated: “Firstly, the basis for the Personal Injuries Commission seems to us to be flawed in that the rise in insurance premiums has nothing at all to do with personal injuries litigation.

In relation to the report itself, Mr Cantillon remarked: “We are surprised at the Commission’s ‘recommendation’ that the sums awarded in whiplash claims should be linked to the severity of the condition. This is already the case, so there is nothing new there.

He added “We would have grave concerns about a standardised approach to the diagnosis, treatment and reporting of soft tissue injuries. No one person or injury is the same. The impact that a back injury might have on a new mother is different to the impact such an injury might have on a young man. A standardised approach would not take sufficient consideration of the individuals circumstances.